See The Universe in a Grain of Sand

Ask me anything   Submit   This is my Everything-Blog. A little bit of my Martial Arts, Music/Poetry and anything that catches my eye/senses. If I like, I Re-Blog. If I reblog something of yours that you wish to have remove, please don't hesitate to let me know.

Dread ina babylon

Dread ina babylon

(Source: rasdivine)

— 27 minutes ago with 19 notes
jaiking:

Follow me at http://jaiking.tumblr.com/ You’ll be glad you did.

jaiking:

Follow me at http://jaiking.tumblr.com/ You’ll be glad you did.

(Source: titsndassohmy)

— 1 day ago with 743 notes
nigerianostalgia:

Hausa Gentleman dressed in Traditional gear. 1900sVintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Hausa Gentleman dressed in Traditional gear. 1900s
Vintage Nigeria

— 1 day ago with 103 notes

nigerianostalgia:

Mounted armed guards of the Emir of Katsina during festival of Sallah, Katsina, Nigeria.

The festivals of Sallah are celebrated on the two big Muslim holidays, Eid-el-Fitri and Eid-el-kabir, in December and February.

The Emir’s armed guards are dressed in the manner of ancient soldiers. Vests of chain armor are visible under the swirling blue robes, and faces peer out from dark indigo turbans wrapped around the head and under the chin.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.
Vintage Nigeria

— 1 day ago with 587 notes
nigerianostalgia:

radiochantier:

Fela Kuti

I’m sure by now you all have noticed my Fela Kuti addiction.

nigerianostalgia:

radiochantier:

Fela Kuti

I’m sure by now you all have noticed my Fela Kuti addiction.

(Source: ilesdessaintes)

— 1 day ago with 806 notes
nigerianostalgia:

A mounted Hausa warrior in full ceremonial regalia, Nigeria 1974Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

A mounted Hausa warrior in full ceremonial regalia, Nigeria 1974
Vintage Nigeria

(via nigerianostalgia)

— 1 day ago with 366 notes

nigerianostalgia:

Ere Ibeji: from “Ibi” = born and ‘eji’ = two; ‘ere' means sacred image)

In earlier times, new-born twins, or ibeji, as they are called, were believed to be evil, monstrous abnormalities and infanticide was a common practice among the Igbos. However, such beliefs and practices were later superseded and reversed, and by the middle of the 18th century twins came to be seen as a blessing; they were awarded the status of minor deities, called Orishas, and their arrival was viewed as an omen of good fortune for the family.

By the 19th century the cult of the Ere Ibeji was firmly established and continues to this day. The death of one or both twins is regarded as a great calamity for the family, one which requires immediate appeasement of the
soul of the deceased child. Read More
Vintage Nigeria

(via nigerianostalgia)

— 1 day ago with 109 notes

the-goddamazon:

basicallyfrench:

letsflytoparis:

247muslima:

THIS

WHERE IS THIS FROM ?

It’s from “la source des femmes”

IT’S TRUE.

THERE IS NOTHING IN THE QU’RAN THAT SAYS WOMEN’S SOLE PURPOSE IS FOR OBEYING AND PROCREATING.

We are allowed to inherit and own property and businesses, and we are allowed to CHOOSE our husbands instead of having them foisted upon us in arranged marriages. WE ARE ALSO ALLOWED TO PARTICIPATE IN COMBAT.

I’ve read the Qu’ran COVER TO COVER and there’s nothing God says about women being LESS than men. In fact, God IMPLORES men to treat women as equals. Probably because God knew men have a tendency to foul things up and has to remind them that WOMEN ARE ALSO PRECIOUS CREATIONS OF HIS DIVINE WILL.

-huffs and puffs-

Sorry. I was in my feelings. But this touches my nerves a lot when people misinterpret Islam as some misogynistic religion. Nothing could be further from the truth.

(Source: qawiya, via ulfric42)

— 1 day ago with 101197 notes